thefilmstage:

The New Yorker delivers a perfect tribute to Philip Seymour Hoffman.

thefilmstage:

The New Yorker delivers a perfect tribute to Philip Seymour Hoffman.

chicagoscreenshots:

Backdraft, 1991, above West Chicago Avenue

Seven days ‘til Chicago.


"I like a lot about the character, just how he is not a cliche, he’s like the biggest badass in the neighborhood, pretty much. This is the one kid at school that you don’t wanna mess with, not that Mickey is in school. But you know, he’s like the one guy that you don’t wanna step to, and he also happens to be closeted and really likes guys. I don’t think we’ve seen that yet and I really like that dynamic."
"I like a lot about the character, just how he is not a cliche, he’s like the biggest badass in the neighborhood, pretty much. This is the one kid at school that you don’t wanna mess with, not that Mickey is in school. But you know, he’s like the one guy that you don’t wanna step to, and he also happens to be closeted and really likes guys. I don’t think we’ve seen that yet and I really like that dynamic."

riverpheenix:

I just want a friendship like Paul Thomas Anderson and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

or pta and john c. reilly

or william h. macy and paul thomas anderson

joaquin and big paulie a.

julianne moore and papa p-town

what I’m saying is want to be friends with Paul Thomas Anderson.

a-bittersweet-life:

There are two kinds of directors; those who have the public in mind when they conceive and make their films and those who don’t consider the public at all. For the former, cinema is an art of spectacle; for the latter, it is an individual adventure. There is nothing intrinsically better about one or the other; it’s simply a matter of different approaches. For Hitchcock as for Renoir, as for that matter almost all American directors, a film has not succeeded unless it is a success, that is, unless it touches the public that one has had in mind right from the moment of choosing the subject matter to the end of production. While Bresson, Tati, Rossellini, Ray make films their own way and then invite the public to join the “game,” Renoir, Clouzot, Hitchcock and Hawks make movies for the public, and ask themselves all the questions they think will interest their audience. Alfred Hitchcock, who is a remarkably intelligent man, formed the habit early—right from the start of his career in England—of predicting each aspect of his films. All his life he has worked to make his own tastes coincide with the public’s, emphasizing humor in his English period and suspense in his American period. This dosage of humor and suspense has made Hitchcock one of the most commercial directors in the world (his films regularly bring in four times what they cost). It is the strict demands he makes on himself and on his art that have made him a great director.
François Truffaut

a-bittersweet-life:

There are two kinds of directors; those who have the public in mind when they conceive and make their films and those who don’t consider the public at all. For the former, cinema is an art of spectacle; for the latter, it is an individual adventure. There is nothing intrinsically better about one or the other; it’s simply a matter of different approaches. For Hitchcock as for Renoir, as for that matter almost all American directors, a film has not succeeded unless it is a success, that is, unless it touches the public that one has had in mind right from the moment of choosing the subject matter to the end of production. While Bresson, Tati, Rossellini, Ray make films their own way and then invite the public to join the “game,” Renoir, Clouzot, Hitchcock and Hawks make movies for the public, and ask themselves all the questions they think will interest their audience. Alfred Hitchcock, who is a remarkably intelligent man, formed the habit early—right from the start of his career in England—of predicting each aspect of his films. All his life he has worked to make his own tastes coincide with the public’s, emphasizing humor in his English period and suspense in his American period. This dosage of humor and suspense has made Hitchcock one of the most commercial directors in the world (his films regularly bring in four times what they cost). It is the strict demands he makes on himself and on his art that have made him a great director.

François Truffaut

Where you wanna go?
- I wanna go away to school.

Get scared. It will do you good. Smoke a bit, stare blankly at some ceilings, beat your head against some walls, refuse to see some people, paint and write. Get scared some more. Allow your little mind to do nothing but function. Stay inside, go out - I don’t care what you’ll do; but stay scared as hell. You will never be able to experience everything. So, please, do poetical justice to your soul and simply experience yourself.
Albert Camus, Notebooks (1951-1959)
We smoked cigarettes. We ate meat. We did everything we can’t do in this dump and it was wonderful! Most of the time nothing happened…like a French movie.





"I don’t want to be mainstream. I like being in the margins. I’m happy where I exist. The things that inspire me I find in the margins. I’m not consciously trying to be marginal, it’s just where I end up and where I live. There’s a gift in there for me and I’m happy to have that gift."
Jim JarmuschBorn January 22, 1953

"I don’t want to be mainstream. I like being in the margins. I’m happy where I exist. The things that inspire me I find in the margins. I’m not consciously trying to be marginal, it’s just where I end up and where I live. There’s a gift in there for me and I’m happy to have that gift."

Jim Jarmusch
Born January 22, 1953

eyebrowgod:

Dawn of the era of the age of the period of the planet of the apes

abs-gabs:

Someone invent a dating website that matches people based on similarities in their netflix queues